Lada

Hello my name is Lada! and... CHEESE!

inmapollito:

Character designs and sample pages from a discarded project called Journey (this is the one I sent to Kana).

I might reuse some of the designs or remake the story someday… I don’t like the way it is now anyway, no wonder they weren’t interested *laughs*

I’m working on a different project now. I’m satisfied with the story for this other one, so I hope I’ll have more luck? (TwT)

It reads from right to left, by the way.

— hace 5 días con 465 notas

thamun:

I started sketching this back when the first episode aired and then kinda procrastinated for 6 weeks. I can’t believe I actually  finished it.

But isn’t it cute how in Future Fish, Nagisa is an astronaut and Rei just happens to be a scientist experimenting with rockets?

(vía lutihlu)

— hace 5 días con 8273 notas

cowsgomoose:

A tutorial by me. Because I can. 

I used Paint Tool Sai, Photoshop, and this square brush set. Yup.

Edit: Oh, and I know there are a ton of spelling errors, sorry! D:

(vía helpyoudraw)

— hace 5 días con 3116 notas

ember-light:

unicornamber:

elenaflutterby:

Tangled comparisons - concept art to the final film. 

why the fuck is the concept art so much better

Actually they were going to do crazy cool animation that would make the film a “living oil painting” but it just proved to be too expensive to mass produce

(vía z-raid)

— hace 6 días con 185709 notas
grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture DrawingAs a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips - Gesture Drawing

As a story artist, I feel like one of the most important technical skill to develop is the ability to draw things things clearly and fast. Practicing 
gesture drawing is, in my opinion, a good way to get better at it. I think it’s fun, too! Of course, you can draw from life and find unique things people and animals do, but I also think practicing gesture drawing from imagination is truly helpful. For instance, I usually do some gesture drawings of characters I’m about to work with in a sequence. It helps me find a short-hand to start building from. The simpler, the better. Especially early on a project, it really helps to find a quick way to draw a character over and over without repeating yourself all the time.

I remember Life Drawing teachers telling me to “draw from within” and to “feel the weight”. It’s absolutely true, but in terms of storyboarding, other elements came to be as important to the process. Silhouette and a sense of “cartooning” is tremendously helpful to communicate certain things clearly to an audience.

I’m only focusing on character posing right now (and this is just an introduction to the subject). Gesture drawing is very close to thumb-nailing, another ultra-helpful skill. More on that later.

For those who want to spend some money on great books on the subject, I highly recommend you to pick up “Drawn To Life: 20 Golden Years of Master Classes of Disney Master Classes” (Vol. 1 and 2) , from Walt Stanchfield. Do it.

Norm

(vía helpyoudraw)

— hace 6 días con 18793 notas
djwaglmuffin preguntó: I need help finding something: Are there any tutorials for "organizing" characters in a montage piece? You know, like one character takes the focus in the composition and then others are around them. I wasn't sure if it was a thing like, making each bit of empty space its own composition or if there is something else to it. For the life of me, I just can't get this one, seemingly simple staple illustration composition done effectively. :(


Contestar:

paintbucketresources:

Heya, thanks for asking! Organizing illustrations with more than three characters (heck, even just one) is really hard, I agree. Basic composition will still assist in this, so here’s a tutorial on that alone.

For a quick tip, triangles work pretty well for dynamic shots with a small handful of characters: 

You can use other shapes too, it’s mostly about where your focus is, where you want the eye to go, is it a scene or is it just a group shot like a poster for a movie.

For a large multiple group, you can always look at paintings from art history! There’s a lot out there with large quantities of people in them, like this Caravaggio piece.

That composition shape, with the long line and two shorter offshoots, is really handy to build off of, too. There’s a great post about it on MuddyColors. You can use character heads as points, like in a constellation. Use gaze to show viewers where to look. Light focus can also highlight the area of interest.

As for negative space, it also helps to think about it, because you still need space for your eyes to rest a little. Sketch out thumbnail sketches first, small ones so you can focus on composition and flow. Shut your eyes for a few seconds and focus on the black inside your eyes, then open them and look at the composition with a fresh look. It also helps to turn it upside down; it’s said that a good composition reads from any view, though that’s not always the case. Also, it helps to ask someone how well it reads.

Starting with composition and thumbnails can save you a lot of troubles with negative space. You can see how the characters are arranged before you draw them, and you can identify large, weird gaps of space before you begin drawing for real.

If you struggle with drawing a lot of bodies in one spot, draw them individually, like on separate layers, and then later, mask or erase the parts that get covered up. If you’re working traditionally, try using a lightbox to trace over separate drawings onto the main sheet. It’s also a good idea to work background to foreground, so draw the background  characters first and work your way up to the foreground characters. 

I hope this answers your question! If not, feel free to ask for more info. :)

— hace 1 semana con 577 notas